Knowledge Center

Search PWYP Norway’s interactive database of reports and research, films, policy proposals, opinion pieces, and much more. To extend or refine your search, sort by dates, regions, issues or other categories.

EITI is a three party cooperation between authorities, companies, and civil society. Everybody needs to come to an agreement now on what the continued process will be for EITI in Norway. Illustration: PWYP Norway  PWYP Norway invites to an open meeting about EITI in Norway on the 2nd of June. The meeting is organised in relation to the EITI Board Meeting that takes place in Oslo. A key question for PWYP Norway is: What should be the way forward for EITI in Norway?
Foto_Jean-Pierre_Pouteau_OECD_CC_BY-NC-ND_20 The OECD has invited interested parties to send comments on a discussion draft, which includes the preliminary results of the work carried out in three different areas on tax-policy. Publish What You Pay Norway has used the opportunity to send in comments. 
-The Norwegian State’s own oil company tries to strangle new regulation that can hinder corruption and tax evasion, writes Norwegian newspaper Klassekampen. -Statoil has gone from being an advocate for transparency to be saboteurs of the openness we want, says Norwegian Minister of Development, Heikki Holmås, to the newspaper.
As a step in completing Publish What You Pay Norway´s TRACE programme , this year´s participants have worked together to produce short briefings on four topics that were selected as priorities, and that they have studied in-depth during the programme. The topics are:
Summary: As a step in completing the TRACE programme, the 2010-2011-participants have worked together to produce short briefings on four selected topics: “contract transparency”, “environmental issues related to EI”, “indigenous peoples´ rights and EI”, and “illicit financial flows and secrecy jurisdictions”.

Oil and gas activity in West Africa is thriving with over 10% of the world’s crude oil coming from this area. There are still vast oil reserves off shore, and at least 34 Norwegian companies have thrown themselves into the battle for the black gold.