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The Panama Papers are the largest data leak journalists have ever worked with. Photo credits: Carolin Fromm / NDR- It was a mild Sunday in early April 2016 that changed my perspective on investigative reporting forever. At exactly 8 pm, the story we’ve been working on in secret for so long, broke: The Panama Papers. 
Prime Minister of Iceland Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson walks out from the interview. - You have to leave your ego outside the door. We are all working together on this and no matter how big or small your news organisations are, said Marina Walker deputy director of ICIJ on my first meeting about the Panama Papers in Washington in May 2015 with around 20 other journalist. This was eleven months before the Panama Papers stories were published all over the world.
The “tax haven – section” contains the requirements for an extended country-by-country reporting, but is put in a Sleeping Beauty slumber. Photo: Christian_A_Calmeyer_(CC_BY-NC-ND_2.0_Flickr).Would the Government like to know about mailbox companies and capital in tax havens? If so, they already have the key themselves.
Senate President Bukola Saraki. Photo: Mohammed Lere, Premium Times. Photograpgh taken with permission from Emmanuel Mayah from article.: ”#PanamaPapers: Hidden family assets of Nigeria’s Senate President, Saraki, uncovered in tax havens”, 4 April 2016.Working on the Panama Papers I have realized, more than ever before, the power of networking and collaboration. The teamwork with international journalists gave me the confidence and empowerment to dare a fearsome figure in the corridor of power.
Prime Minister Erna Solberg. Foto: Heiko Junge/NTB scanpix/SMK (CC BY-NC 2.0/Flicker). Have we not learned anything from Panama and Paradise Papers? The government proposes to remove the economic support  that gives the opportunity for NGOs to work for transparency in capital flows.
Mihran Poghosyan. Fotograph: Compulsory Enforcement Service (Wikimedia / Creative Commons / Mamuli qartughar)Armenia’s Special Investigative Service (SIS) dropped the offshore business case against former Chief Compulsory Enforcement Service Officer Mihran Poghosyan in January this year.Writen by Kristine Agalaryan* (photograph on the right) 
Clare Rewcastle, founder of the Sarawak Report and Radio Free Sarawak UK/ Malaysia. Photo: Dominique James Off-shore "paradise" islands are back in the news and as far as I am concerned they should stay in the news until these shelters for the super-rich, tax evaders and also mega-criminals are sorted out.
Statoil's tax director Finn Lexov stated that the company chose the Netherlands because of the favorable tax laws. The oil industry is calling it “stable and predictable", writes the Mona Thowsen. Photo: Kjell Eson, v/ Flickr: CC BY - NC - ND 2.0 Statoil and others should be forced to report on their mailbox empires. Or does the State prefer to get this sort of information through the news?
Norwegian Bank Investment Management (NBIM) asked PWYP Norway for feedback in an Expectations document on taxes and transparency.