Conferance 2016 "Making Transparency Possible"

           A 3-day conferance with 40 speakers from 19 countries 

Click here to view the lecture material from keynote speakers on December 13th:                    "How to disclose multinational corporate secrecy, corruption and tax avoidance? Investigative journalists, whistleblower, lawyers, trade union leaders."

Click here to view the lecture material from keynote speakers on December 14th:                  "What tools can nation states use when faced with systemic avoidances? Prosecutors, academics, private sector, development institutions, editors and investigative journalists."

________________________________

31 speakers and panelists contributed to new perspectives about financial transparency: reports and analysis related to the Panama Papers, debates about whether whistle-blowers should be protected or arrested, and the story of how Ivan Velasquez`anti-corruption work took down the whole Guatemalan government.

The protection of whistle-blowers in Norway is inadequate, journalist Siri Gedde-Dahl established in a debate with professor Elisabeth Eide, journalist John Lloyd, and secretary general in Norwegian Association of Editors, Arne Jensen, concerning how conditions for investigative journalism can be improved. The debate followed Jensen´s contribution on 10 commandments to increase the insight, transparency, and access to important information. Seated in the hall was Raphael Halet, one of the LuxLeaks whistle-blowers who risked many years in prison for having leaked information on Luxemburg´s facilitation of tax evasion.

Investigative journalists from 14 countries shared knowledge of how many of them have cooperated trans-nationally in large in-depth cases, which spread over several countries. This has become particularly relevant after large leaks, such as the Panama Papers, Lux Leaks, and Swiss Leaks. The Icelandic journalist Johannes Kristjansson shared his experiences when he decided to lock himself in a cabin in the Icelandic wilderness in order to work undisturbed on the Panama Papers without anyone´s knowledge. Kristjansson´s revelations about the Icelandic prime minister´s private investments later led to the prime minister having to resign. We find similar stories from Armenia, South Africa, Malaysia, Nigeria, Guatemala, and Ecuador.

Big lines were also drawn. Professor in economics Kalle Moene, law professor Beate Sjåfjell, and professor in economics John Andrew McNeish were among those who debated global power shift, what role people are left with when pitted against large multi-national corporations, and what can be done when legislation prevents access and a right to information. 

  • See how the program was on the 12th December, day 1: 
    • "The art of exposing a rich thief"
      Host of the day - Prof. of Journalism Kristin Skare Orgeret, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA)

    • 19:00 – 19:15:  Welcome: by Jan Gunnar Furuly, Chairman of SKUP Award (SKUP).

      19:15 – 20:20: Journalistic investigations from three continents.
      -The stories.
      -Challenges and solutions along the way.
      -Consequences of exposure.

    • Journalists participating:

      - Clare Rewcastle Brown, investigative reporter and founder of Sarawak Report and Radio Free Sarawak, Malaysia
      - Craig McKune, investigative journalist for amaBhungane, Centre for Investigative Journlism, South Africa
      - Rodrigo Veliz, investigative journalist, Guatemala

      20:20 - 20:40: Break: Norwegian Christmas drink and gingerbread

      20: 40- 21:10: Panama Papers: Cooperation across borders, professions and newsrooms.

      Journalists participating:

      - Johannes Kr. Kristjansson, investigative journalist for Reykjavik Media
      - Kristine Agalaryan, investigative journalist for ww.hetq.am, Armenia
      - Joshua Olufemi, investigative journalist at Premium Times Centre for Investigative Journalism, Nigeria

      21:10- 21:30: Debate: When the state does not want to, or is incapable of investigating use of tax havens, and journalists are left to do the job:
      - How can the conditions for investigative journalism be improved?
      - Does Panama Papers signify a new era in the field of investigative journalism?

  • See how the program was on the 13th December, day 2:
    • "Making Transparency Possible":
      How to reveal multinational companies' tax avoidance? 

      Host of the day - Stig Arild Pettersen, journalist and host, Podcast "Du verden!" and "Ja, de penga"

    • 08:15 - 09:00    Registration

      09:00 - 09:15    Welcome, Nina Waaler, vice-rector, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA), Mona Thowsen, secretary general, Publish What You Pay Norway

      09:15 - 09:45    Why Transparency? Cobus de Swardt, Managing Director, Transparency International

    • Session 1: What is the Problem?

    • 09:45 - 10:15    Panama Papers - an expected scandal. Prof. Dr. Juris Beate Sjåfjell, University of Oslo (UiO)

      10:15 - 10:45    The art of making a corporate maze with untraceable structures and owners, PhD. Linn Anker Sørensen, University of Oslo (UiO)

      10:45 - 11:15    Panel debate: What can we do when the legal and economic system prevents neccesary information and insight?
      - Moderator: Prof. of Law and Economics Tina Søreide, Norwegian School of Economics (NHH)
      - Prof. Dr, Juris Beate Sjåfjell, University of Oslo (UiO)
      - PhD. Linn Anker Sørensen, University of Oslo (UiO)

      11:15 - 12:15    Lunch

    • Session 2: Power Asymmetry

    • 12:15 - 12:35    Global power shift: Companies vs. the people. Prof. of Political Economy of International Development and the Environment John Andrew McNeish, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU)

      12:35 - 12:55    Why should workers care about their companies' lack of transparency?​ Daniel Bertossa, Director of Policy and Governance, Public Services International, the Global Union Federation

      12:55 - 13:15    Inequality for all? Prof. of Economics Kalle Moene, University of Oslo (UiO)

      13:15 - 14:00    Panel debate:  Global powershift: Why should we care about the consequences?
      - Moderator: Stig Arild Pettersen, journalist and host, Podcast "Du verden!" and "Ja, de penga"
      - Prof. of Political Economy of International Development and the Environment John Andrew McNeish, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU)
      - Daniel Bertossa, Director of Policy and Governance, Public Services International, the Global Union Federation
      - Prof. of Economics Kalle Moene, University of Oslo (UiO)
      - Roger Heimli, Norwegian Union of Municipal and General Employees (Fagforbundet)

    • 14:00 - 14:20    Tea/Coffee

    • Session 3: Revelations

    • 14:20 - 14:40    Sued by the president: the cost of exposing oil contracts in Panama, Christian Zurita Ron, investigative journalist, Ecuador

      14:40 - 15:00    How can a journalist explain to the world what is going on in a tax haven? Jan Lukas Strozyk, investigative journalist who worked with Swiss Leaks, Lux Leaks, Panama Leaks, Germany

      15:00 - 15:20    Why I decided to become a whistleblower in the Lux Leaks? Raphaël Halet, former accountant at PwC, Luxembourg

      15:20 - 15:40   Thief or whistleblower -  arrest or protect? Amélie Lefebvre, lawyer, cabinet BOURDON & FORESTIER, which represents the whistleblowers E. Snowden and A. Deltour, France

      15:40 - 16:25    Panel debate: How to get access to information when more than 60% of global transactions are in the dark?
      - Moderator: Assoc. Prof. Anne Hege Simonsen, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA)
      - Christian Zurita Ron, investigative journalist, Ecuador
      - Jan Lukas Strozyk, investigative journalist, Germany
      - Raphaël Halet, former accountant at PwC, Luxembourg
      - Amélie Lefebvre, lawyer, Bourdon & Forestier, France

  • See how the program was on the 14th of December, day 3:
    • "Making Transparency Possible":
      What tools do governments have in their toolbox, if they want?
      Host of the day - Stig Arild Pettersen, journalist and host, Podcast "Du verden!" and "Ja, de penga"

    • 08:15 - 09:00    Registration

    • 09:00 - 09:05    Welcome, Mona Thowsen, secretary general, Publish What You Pay Norway

    • Session 4: Against all odds

    • 09:05 - 09:15    Brief background on the unique case of Guatemala. Prof. of Political Science Benedicte Bull, University of Oslo (UiO)

      09:15 - 10:00    Against all odds in Guatemala - a corruption case involving the highest political and military levels. Iván Velásquez, CommissionerInternational Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala, (CICIG), Guatemala

      10:00 - 10:30    Panel debate: How to hold a president and a vice-president accountable for corruption charges? 
      - Moderator: Prof. of Political Science Benedicte Bull, University of Oslo (UiO)
      - Ivan Velasquez, CommissionerCICIG, Guatemala
      - Assoc. Prof. Mariel Støen, University of Oslo  (UiO)
      - Rodrigo Veliz, investigative journalist, Guatemala

      10:30 - 11:00    Panel Debate: From Guatemala to Norway: How independent are our own control institutions?
      - Moderator: Stig Arild Pettersen, journalist and host, Podcast "Du verden!" and "Ja, de penga"
      - Hans Christian Holte, Director, The Norwegian Tax Administration
      - Per Kristian Foss, Chairman of the Board of Auditors General, Office for the Auditor General
      - Trond Eirik Schea, Director, The Norwegian National Authority for Investigation and Prosecution of Economic and Environmental Crime

    • 11:00 - 11:20    Tea/Coffee

    • Session 5: Regulators' efforts after Panama Papers

    • 11:20 - 11:45    Why is it necessary to differentiate between taxation mechanisms and transparency mechanisms? Frian Aarsnes, Director, ECON Management Consulting

    • 11:45 - 12:10    OECD: Friend or foe in a fight for transparency? Prof. of Law and Economics Tina Søreide, Norwegian School of Economics (NHH)

    • 12:10 - 12:35    Private sector: Friend or foe in a fight for transparnecy? Jon Vea, former ambassador to Angola, advisor at Confederation of Norwegian Enterprise (NHO)

      12:35 - 13:20    Panel debate: What should Norway do to become a leader in financial transparency?
      - Moderator: Turid Sylte, journalist, Vårt Land
      - Jon Lomøy, Director, Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (Norad)
      - Jon Vea, former ambassador to Angola, advisor, Confederation of Norwegian Enterprise (NHO)
      - Prof. of Law and Economics Tina Søreide, Norwegian School of Economics (NHH)
      - Frian Aarsnes, Director, ECON Management Consulting

      13:20 - 14:20    Lunch

    • Session 6: The Fourth Power

    • 14:20 - 14:40    How to be bureau chief in Russia, a country with limited access to insight? John Lloyd, contributing editor, The Financial Times

      14:40 - 15:00    What to do when access to information is not given? Olesya Shmagun, investigative journalist, Russia

      15:00 - 15:20    Access to information: How does it (not) work in Ethiopia? Tsedale Lemma, Editor in Chief of Addis Standard, Ethiopia 

      15:20 - 15:40    Which transparency mechanisms would help journlists with necessary access to information? Arne Jensen, secretary general, the Association of Norwegian Editors

      15:40 - 16:25    Panel debate: What can be done to improve the conditions for investigative journalism?​
      - Moderator: Prof. of Journalism Roy Krøvel, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences (HiOA)
      -  Prof. of Journalism Elisabeth Eide, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norwegian PEN
      - John Lloyd, contributing editor, The Financial Times
      - Arne Jensen, secretary general, the Association of Norwegian Editors
      - Siri Gedde-Dahl, journalist, Kapital

    • 16:25 - 16:40     Closing remarks, Jan Gunnar FurulyChairman, SKUP, foundation for promoting investigative journalism in Norway

    • 16:40 - 16:45     Thank You, Mona Thowsen, secretary general, Publish What You Pay Norway

Engelsk